The Student News Site of Lynbrook High School

Horizon

The Student News Site of Lynbrook High School

Horizon

The Student News Site of Lynbrook High School

Horizon

Editor-In-Chief, Out!

Photo Courtesy of Olivia Lanteri
Photo Courtesy of Olivia Lanteri

When I tell people about my intended major of architecture, I get a lot of surprised reactions. They assume I’m pursuing journalism, given my reputation is intricately intertwined with this newspaper. I’m sure most people could figure this out before they’ve even met me. I’ve been in the lobby distributing new editions at 7:00 AM, mentioned on the announcements, and absent from lunch periods all because of this paper. It made its way into every crevice of my schedule; I practically consider it a class on its own. But unlike other classes, Horizon has given me the gifts of leadership, friendship, and community. This club is more than a club, even if it’s an award-winning one; it was essential in developing me into the person who will walk the stage on June 26.

The funny thing about life is that you never know what’s going to happen. Coming into high school, I dreamed of joining Mathletes and Science Olympiad, thinking I was set to be a STEM star. The star dimmed a bit thanks to my disenchantment with those clubs’ Webex meetings and a beefier workload. I was feeling lost when my friend and fellow editor Madeleine Malinka encouraged me to log onto a Horizon meeting, letting spontaneity happen for once. The confidence and control of former-Editor-in-Chief Juila Swerdin as well as the set rules and deadlines of the club intimidated freshman me. I sat at my desk at home collecting notes and questions to bombard poor Julia with through the shotty Webex audio. I knew nothing about this intricate process, but I wanted to peel back its layers and see how it worked. 

Slowly learning the editing guides, I began to understand the structure of an article and what made a great one. I saw Horizon’s prestigious past as a top newspaper as an exciting challenge, so I began to invest more heavily into the quality of my articles and consider writing about more difficult subjects. Nevertheless, having fun with what I was writing about was always on my mind; sure, there were moments when I was trudging through a difficult-to-write paragraph and obligated to report on an event I wasn’t excited about, but I learned to have passion for my subjects. My freshman and sophomore years were critical times in my development as a writer, with Horizon being the chief force behind my progress. I cannot mention how many times my experience with writing and editing articles has come into play; in fact, Mrs. Sanders was constantly in my head when I wrote my college essay. The ability to communicate clearly and eloquently through words is a life-long skill, but I’d say I have a pretty big leg-up thanks to this newspaper.

Junior year was hectic for obvious reasons, but it was key in my development as a leader and a person. The large jump to the opinions managing editor position after a year as features section editor was one that I was willing to take. I was hungry to take on the six-article minimum needed for opinions in each print edition while writing four myself. Handling my managing editor responsibilities in addition to my schoolwork helped me learn the importance of balance and taking stress off your plate when you need to. It also helped me develop my communication skills with others; through keeping an active group chat and being proactive when problems arose, the opinions section ran like a tight ship. I cherish the time I spent working with all of my section members. 

If my friendships in freshman and sophomore year were a cake, they would’ve come out of the oven half-baked. It was that critical junior year when they went back in for an extra ten minutes. I’m happy to say that many of these connections started in my earliest years of high school were solidified in my third year, many of which were my Horizon “family.” Alyssa Inserra became an older sister to me. Kate Chiulli, an inspiration. Kerry Cullen, Lexi Raynor, Madeleine Malinka, Cassandra Levinson, Gianna Longo, Miranda Mangru—I’m so honored to be your friend. The sheer talent and force of you beautiful and strong women make me so proud to lead this powerhouse of a club. To the rest of the staff: thank you, from the bottom of my heart, for being the best of the best. This club would be nothing without you guys. And, of course, Mrs. Sanders—I’ve seen you lose well-deserved sleep and sanity over this past year helping Lexi and I push each edition out. You are truly the most hard-working person I’ve ever met, making sure all your t’s are crossed and your i’s dotted. I treasure every deep and insightful conversation we’ve had, where you’ve passed down your invaluable wisdom and kindness (and opinions on fashion!). I will dearly miss your sense of humor, grit, intelligence, resilience, and, of course, your gorgeous handouts. 

Now here I am, at the end of my senior year, pooped out by APs and a raging case of senioritis. I am a tired woman, but also a content one. I’m ready to move on to a new chapter of my life, but I will never forget the time I spent in Horizon. You guys have made my high school years enjoyable and were a backbone to my happiness. I love you all so much and I can’t wait to hear about all the inevitable future successes of this incredible club!

Editor-In-Chief, out!

All my love, 

Olivia

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About the Contributor
Olivia Lanteri
Olivia Lanteri, Print Editor-in-Chief
Hey you! Thanks for checking out my profile. I am a member of the Class of 2024 and a storyteller at heart. I love to spend time with my family and friends, read, and watch way too much YouTube in my spare time. I enjoy writing and editing for Horizon.