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The Student News Site of Lynbrook High School

Horizon

The Student News Site of Lynbrook High School

Horizon

Celebrities Are Not at Fault for Using Ozempic

Celebrities+Are+Not+at+Fault+for+Using+Ozempic
Noemie Rivera

For some, the pressure to have an “ideal” or “perfect” body type according to the ever-changing beauty standard can be too great to withstand. Ozempic has taken the internet by storm after its misuse for weight loss purposes revealed the drastic effects of unrealistic expectations set by beauty standards. Celebrities understandably fall victim to trying to meet these expectations, too; they are just human after all. Although they are misusing the drug, celebrities should not be rebuked for using Ozempic for weight loss purposes. 

Despite this, when people use drugs that are not meant for them, it harms those who actually need said drug for their health. This is precisely why individuals should conduct their own research and use their judgment before allowing themselves to be influenced by a celebrity or trend—it would be wrong not to.

According to UC Davis Health, Ozempic, formally known as semaglutide, is meant to help adults with type-2 diabetes. It does so by slowing digestion and mimicking hormones that send signals to the brain that one is full. Once one stops taking this drug, the lost weight will most likely be gained back. According to The American Diabetes Association’s website (diabetes.org), Ozempic “is not a medication for people who do not have diabetes or are at risk of type-2 diabetes.” However, according to the GoodRX website (goodrx.com), the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved semaglutide under the name of “Wegovy” to treat chronic obesity, not specifically diabetes. 

Though taking semaglutide is not as effective as weight-loss surgery, it is more easily accessible, which likely explains its rise to popularity. Celebrities who have admitted to using semaglutide use include Amy Schumer, Oprah Winfrey, Tracy Morgan, Sharon Osbourne, Dolores Catania, and more. Oprah Winfrey spoke with People magazine to say that using the drug is “not something to hide behind and once again be ridiculed for.” In the article “Stars Who’ve Spoken About Ozempic — and What They’ve Said,” some commented on it in a more comedic way, such as Tracy Morgan who joked, “It cuts my appetite in half. Now I only eat half a bag of Doritos.” Although it is easy to make lighthearted jokes, the fact of the matter is that this only feeds into the trend of taking Ozempic.

Additionally, mass usage of semaglutide could create a shortage of the medication, harming those who are actually in need of the drug for health purposes. This is unfair, as it potentially puts diabetes patients in a tough position. Some patients have been forced to “ration” their supply of the drug. Although they can switch to different prescriptions in an event like this, they should not have to; after all, this drug was meant for them. Additionally, just like any other weight-loss trend or fad, Ozempic can have negative effects on one’s mental health. One can feel pressure to take medications or restrict his eating, instead of simply focusing on eating healthily and exercising. Despite this, sophomore Gianna Lundy explained, “If people are in the process of losing weight, they might want to use a drug like Ozempic because it would not disrupt their lifestyle.”

Unfortunately, social media platforms like TikTok allow trends such as the misuse of Ozempic to spread like wildfire. According to the Illinois State Medical Society, the Ozempic hashtag on TikTok has amassed an astounding 300 million views. “I’ve seen videos about Ozempic, specifically people showing their results from taking it,” commented senior Ava Palazzola. Taking a certain drug, harmful or not, should never be a social media trend.

Data shows, according to The Washington Post, how prescriptions of semaglutide have “quadrupled between early 2020 and the end of last year” and indicates that medical providers are prescribing the drug “off-label,” meaning for a different use than the drug’s intended one. Clearly, celebrities are not the only people using Ozempic or a similar drug for weight loss. This trend, like many weight-loss trends, has the very real possibility to be dangerous, to both the intended recipients and non. It is wholly unfair to diabetes patients whose access to a necessary drug is being limited. Before following a trend, whether because of a celebrity or social media, people should educate themselves on the risks of doing so.

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About the Contributor
Eliza Fucci, Editor
Hi, my name is Eliza Fucci, and I’m a member of the Class of 2024. I am also a part of GirlUp, S.T.A.R.T., S.K.I.P., and NHD club. In my free time, I love to read, listen to music, and hang out with my friends. I also love being a part of Horizon!